Tracing really isn’t that bad

17 Dec

Thank you for the compliments on this weekend’s knit jumper! Party was a lot of fun and the dress was very warm and comfy.


I now realize my goal in life is to turn new people on to Burda World of Fashion. It’s a mighty task that the sewing gods have entrusted me with, but I feel that I am up for it and must rise to the challenge. Why? Because the more you sewists get addicted to BWOF, the less likely it will ever go out of production (unlike Blueprint Magazine which Christina let me know last week was ceasing production. I swear Martha Stewart wants me to fight her.)

There are two things that seem to turn people off the Burda World of Fashion. The first is the sparse directions and the second is having to trace out the pattern. A good book will help you with the first, but I thought I could show you one of methods I use to trace and add seam allowances.

Over the years I’ve picked up two handy tools. One is this Clover double tracing wheel. I’ve seen it as cheap as $4. The second is a vintage Traum Tracing Wheel (with Seam Guide). *** ETA: When I posted this eBay link there were five Traums for less than $5. It seems that only the $20 one is now available. Hold out for the less expensive one! The first was a Joann purchase, the second came free — stuffed in my sewing machine table!

First, trace your pattern size. I have two traced here because I want to blend the 38 and 40 at the thigh.

Now, I’ll show you how I use the Clover double tracing wheel. After you trace your pattern, pin the pattern to your fabric. Then, follow the seam line with your double tracing wheel. The wheel will put a nicely dotted line along the pattern paper — delivering an easy to follow cutting line. Now, the wheel is adjustable by 1/4 increments. So, the natural seam allowances are 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 and 1 inch. But, I found that a slight bend to one wheel and it easily makes a perfect 5/8 seam allowance.


The second one (comes with an orange or pink handle, in case you are interested) has two lines. One is 1/2 inch the second is 5/8 inch. It’s not quite as accurate or easy to handle as the Clover, but it works well. And, it leaves a ‘stronger’ marking. It was originally intended to mark the seam line on patterns when they weren’t printed.


I know there is a rotary cutter with a seam guide available. But, I still cut with scissors. I just kind of like the way it feels. I will use a rotary cutter for knits sometimes.

This little project is a pair of yoga pants from the November BWOF in an icy pale blue stretch velour (the fabric on the left). I’m not really a Juicy kind of girl, but I fell in love with the color. I might make a matching top over Christmas. We’ll see how I feel about the pants!

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4 Responses to “Tracing really isn’t that bad”

  1. Erika November 1, 2009 at 01:29 #

    Do you know where I can find the rotary cutter with a seam guide?

    Thanks

  2. Damien April 19, 2013 at 07:44 #

    Hey just wanted to give you a quick heads up and let you know a few of the pictures aren’t loading properly. I’m not sure why but I think its a linking issue.
    I’ve tried it in two different internet browsers and both show the same results.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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