San Antonio, Texas

 photo USER1787_zpsxwwygc1n.jpg

We are back from beautiful, warm and gracious San Antonio, Texas! My parents lived in the San Antonio area (Garden Ridge) some 15 years ago and I remember visiting them many times. But, somehow, I never got a real feel for the area. After spending the long holiday weekend there, I can tell you I love it. First, it was warm an sunny our first day. Second, I can’t remember the last American city I’ve been to that had so much diversity. We kept remarking at different sites at how many times we saw people of different ethnicities socializing together. There was such great American history and culture in San Antonio. We stayed at a fantastic inn in the King William / Southtown neighborhood and were walking distance from the Riverwalk and all the major attractions.

 photo USER1778_zpsevcc55bk.jpg

But, my biggest personal draw to San Antonio was the chance to meet Amanda from Amanda’s Sewing Adventures. She was kind enough to introduce us to real Texas BBQ on our first full day in town. I say ‘introduce’ because there really was a lot to learn :-) Like, did you know brisket can come ‘wet’? Until this trip, I thought brisket was boring and I didn’t know what the big deal was. After this trip, brisket is my jam. Also, from now on, I might try and meet sewing bloggers over local food instead of fabric.

meat photo IMG_20150214_114816_zps17j9sqhs.jpg

It’s possible I plan trips around what other sewing bloggers I can meet. If I’m being honest, when we start talking about places to go, I do run through a mental list of ‘Who do I know…’ Sadly, Amanda didn’t bring her recent pink coat so I could take it back to Baltimore with me.

We got rained out of our bike tour of the city and missions on our second day. So, we made up for it by going back out for more BBQ. The Big Bib opened at noon and I kid you not, there was a line 30 people deep when they opened the door.

 photo USER1814_zpsjvfvjbvb.jpg

 photo USER1820_zpsidqdwemp.jpg

My dad was also in San Antonio for the weekend and we got to spend a little time with him before heading back home. It’s good to see him smiling again.

 photo USER1934_zpsmulywhxg.jpg

I naturally took the opportunity of being in Texas to dress like an American Flag.

 photo IMG_20150216_161609_zpsjshapp2n.jpg

Heh.

My last funny about TX is I reserved a hybrid or sub-compact car while we were in San Antonio. When we arrived, they gave us a Toyota 4Runner as it was the smallest car they had available. I guess everything really is bigger in Texas.

But, for real. From now own, President’s Day weekend gets spent in a warmer climate. We came back home to 8 degrees (-13 in Celsius) and snow. I also really like that in the last year I’ve done more traveling in the continental US. Growing up an Army brat we were always taking trips overseas. But, I’ve really come to appreciate all the great places there are in the States you can visit.

Burda 9/2012 #130: Sweater Knit Semi Fail

I first made this September 2012 Burda Style sweater  two years ago in a poly sweater knit (line drawing and pattern description in that post). It was extremely flattering and I got compliments every time I wore it. But, given a few years and the poor quality of the knit, it pilled and got gross. So, I thought I’d recreate it in a wool blend sweater knit I bought in Mood back in December 2013. The pattern is still available for individual download.

 photo DSC_0336_zps6asrk3qt.jpg

When I first started this project, I thought more than a few times about underlining it with a tricot knit for fabric support. But, I wanted some instant gratification and I didn’t. It’s too bad, because the material has ZERO recovery and stretches any which way you move it. So, it doesn’t hold it’s shape well. Which makes it impossible to get the curve hugging I did from my first version.

 photo DSC_0358_zpsm013jfwl.jpg

It ends up looking stretched out after just a few wears. I’ve taken it in several times already. But, at the end of this shoot, you can see that it’s stretched out at the hips. I just don’t know how long for this world this top is.

 photo DSC_0346_zpsyfpdw4sa.jpg

I love the color, I love that it’s wool and I love a sweater knit. But, the fabric doesn’t have enough recovery to work on a body skimming sweater. I didn’t even bother with the side and sleeve ruching since I knew it wasn’t going to ‘hold’.  Even the hem is wonky. It looks lovely after a press, but one bit of tension and it’s all out of sorts. Plus, I’ve worn it twice and it’s already pilling ::sad trombone::

 photo DSC_0360_zpsmhstpnqd.jpg

This fabric also didn’t take the drape at the neck very well. I might actually lower the front neckline if I make the patter again.

 photo DSC_0351_zpsuziftapy.jpg

I did make a swayback adjustment, added darts in my FBA.

 photo DSC_0354_zpsx8xdrpal.jpg

Yet, I gotta give it a solid ‘meh’. Mostly due to fabric choice.

 photo DSC_0353_zpsc3epex6x.jpg

In exciting news, my friend Liz  and I started a photography class at the local community college. We’ve both always like taking photos. And, when Jordan gifted me a new DSLR at Christmas, I gave my beloved white Pentax k-x to her and we’re taking a class together. So, be prepared to be bored with loads of landscapes and such over the next few months.

Revisiting the La Mia Boutique Sweatshirt Dress

 photo DSC_0144_zpswdkg9gfc.jpg

One of my most worn and beloved garments is my LMB sweatshirt dress from the August 2008 Italian magazine. Such a simple design and concept in a sweatshirt dress. I got compliments every time I wore that dress!  After five years of wear, I thought it was time I made up a new one. Or, two.

 photo DSC_0155_zpsxkq7nuyn.jpg

Yes, yes. In my last post I said I was getting back to color. And, yet, here I am again sewing grey and navy. What can I say? I’m currently a sucker for simplicity.

 photo bf8d6ae4.jpg

Like last time, I made the largest size in LMB, a 46 and left off the pockets. Which, makes me think I was sewing clothes way big for me five years ago. Or, I like my clothes a little snugger now? But, this time I added some six centimeters of wearing ease around the thighs and attempted a FBA. Other alterations?

 photo DSC_0134_zpspgzemu9x.jpg

Well, I tried to add some shaping at the waist. It remains unclear if this worked or not. I also took off my standard 1/4 inch off the shoulders.

 photo DSC_0151_zpslqiufroi.jpg

I also shortened the sleeves a good three inches. And, I took about four inches of length off the hem of the original pattern.

 photo DSC_0130_zpsbfshgvp1.jpg

One thing I’ve noticed is I have inconsistent dart placement when I add FBAs to garments.  Sometimes they are SO LOW. In this one, I had to take out my original dart and pin it into the right place. In retrospect, this probably could have been a dartless FBA to keep with the loose fitting silhouette.

 photo DSC_0125_zpsbb3sdb7r.jpg

I sewed everything but the darts on my serger. And, if you’re wondering, my ribbing is all local and $1 a pack. That’s right. Stadham Corp here in Baltimore charged me $1 for a pair of cuffs and another $1 for the hem cuffs.

 photo DSC_0005_zpsc0vjffkx.jpg

And now I’m off to work on a Valentine’s Day dress. We’re spending the long weekend in San Antonio, Texas. We debated between there and Cleveland, Ohio. But, based on today’s weather report, it’s already 30 degrees warmer in San Antonio than both Baltimore and Cleveland. So, that was an easy choice.

Ponte Wrap Top: Burda Style 10-2012 #119

10-2012 -119 (12 of 25) photo 10-2012-11912of25_zpse11ed407.jpg

I was so bored making this grey top I almost fell asleep typing the title. Last top was black and grey. This one is like a muddy  grey. I really do prefer grey to black. And, I *like* grey. But, I am a magpie. I gotta sew color.

10-2012 -119 (25 of 25) photo 10-2012-11925of25_zps7fa45ad6.jpg

I am still on the basics train for hourglass figures.  Wrap tops rank high with items that work. They provide waist definition and a low/ wide neckline. And, I liked that this one from Burda has some length to it (no need to cut me off at the waist) and had darts in the back for shaping. I *think* next time I’ll make it with 3/4 sleeves too.

10-2012 -119 (2 of 25) photo 10-2012-1192of25_zpsdae9b446.jpg

I’m trying to build my casual work wardrobe. And, I’ve quickly realized that’s going to mean a lot more separates in my life. I was worried this top would be Burda-low in the front. But, I think it’s actually ok.

10-2012 -119 (16 of 25) photo 10-2012-11916of25_zps796c54d3.jpg

I made a 1.5 inch FBA. For my size, the recommendation would be 2 inches of length and one inch of width. FYI, somehow, I’ve only just discovered this chart for seeing the BWOF design lines. So helpful to know where they put the bust point. Anywho, my original dart was ridiculous. First, it was huge (read 1.5 inch FBA). It was also thick because of the ponte.

10-2012 -119 (3 of 25) photo 10-2012-1193of25_zps0f43629c.jpg

Second, if you look where my finger was pointing, the original dart was way, way way too long and low. “Long and Low” are words you should never use to describe your bust. Not sure if this is a product of a bias, stretch item. Also, they totally point down instead of up (or rather ‘to’ my BP) as you can see below. I’ve already altered to pattern so hopefully the next time will be better.

10-2012 -119 (4 of 25) photo 10-2012-1194of25_zpsdb7cf533.jpg

I used my coverstitch for the neckline and hems with wool nylon on the lower looper. I reinforced the armhole with my Viseline tape, the neckline and shoulders with bias fusible interfacing. In thin knits I sew with a 1/4 inch seam allowance. But, with a thicker knit you gots to go with 1/2 inch.

10-2012 -119 (8 of 25) photo 10-2012-1198of25_zps7ece1261.jpg

I suspect this fabric is a little thicker than intended. The pattern suggests drapey knit fabrics. But, I was looking for cosy comfy tops to wear to work. I really love how the darts in back give great shaping.

10-2012 -119 (17 of 25) photo 10-2012-11917of25_zps21a62f5c.jpg

I took it in quite a bit at the waist to make sure I had some definition. But, I am not big on how the side seams on wrap tops always seem to pull forward a bit.

10-2012 -119 (9 of 25) photo 10-2012-1199of25_zpsaeadf9fe.jpg

I think the back, like in almost every Burda I sew, is a little wide at the neck. I would reccomend a little wedge in the neckline for fit and for me, adding a 1/4 – 1/2 inch at the shoulder neckline so bra straps don’t show.

10-2012 -119 (19 of 25) photo 10-2012-11919of25_zps2f55c530.jpg

I quite like this top. But, it really grew on me.  Originally, I kind of felt like a concrete brick. I think with a looser weave fabric, this will be a real winner. In the meantime, warm and cuter than a sweatshirt.

10-2012 -119 (15 of 25) photo 10-2012-11915of25_zps16ab1711.jpg

Ok. I gotta sew some color.

Black Knit Double Tee: Burda 8-2010-112

 photo -_1200x1200-ID194673-_zpsc815a306.jpeg

8-2010-112

I’m almost a little embarrassed to even blog this basic knit tee shirt. But, I’ve discovered if I don’t blog it, I almost can’t keep track of what I’ve made and what worked / didn’t.  And, I think I may have found a basic TNT tee shirt pattern.  Besides, I always like a layered look and had long admired this tee from BWOF.  And, after my last knit top, I thought I should try something more along the guidelines for my body type. I figured with a FBA, darts and the right amount of ease, this double tee top from Burda would work.

Also, photos are a little soft. Jordan bought me a new camera and some lens for Christmas and I’m still playing around with it :-)

 photo DSC_0130_zps27c49c2d.jpg

For my version,  I sewed a 40 grading to a 46 starting at my waist. I used two cotton interlock knits from my stash in black and light grey. While a lot of people are trying to incorporate color into their wardrobe, I’m always trying to put in solid neutrals. And, since I wear jeans nearly every single day now, I thought this top provided interest but is still casual.  Essentially, the pattern is one sleeveless top attached to a long sleeve top. I joined mine at the armscyce and tacked it down in the shoulder seams. I decided to shorten the sleeves to 3/4 length to limit the expansion of fabric. Other alterations? I shortened the shoulder seam by almost 1/2 an inch. Next time, I’ll also make a sloping shoulder adjustment.

 photo DSC_0145_zpsc1798eb1.jpg

The oringal is dartless. So, I did a 1.5 inch FBA and added a dart. A dart you can’t see because I’m wearing black and taking photos indoors. Winter = ten degrees out today.

 photo DSC_0136_zps9b73193b.jpg

I also made a 1.25 inch swayback adjustment. It looks like I could use a hair more.

As for length, these days  I like things to end just about my widest part to create a longer line. Some examples of how it looks different were it to be hemmed at various lengths:

 photo DSC_0121_zpsf4fec7e9.jpg

I think this shows my widest part are my thighs and not my hips. Even though my hands are covering my *actual* hip.  So… no more waist length tops for me I think.

 photo DSC_0122_zps9a5a6922.jpg

This ends right above my widest part (just below my hip line). I think it is a better than waist level.

 photo DSC_0124_zps49a7b9de.jpg

And this is the length I used. Here, I’m pointing to my widest part. I also think next time, I’ll lower the center of the necklines of both by 1/4 – 1/2 inch. Hmm, which means I think you’ll be seeing me in this pattern again.

I was a little bored taking photos and started doing moves from Beyonce’s 7/11 video. Because, Beyonce (I would have done number #10, but I don’t have any red Solo cups).

 photo DSC_0157_zps2ee24951.jpg

Thanks for all the feedback on my last post. I have more comments and folks I’d like to respond to. I think there was an amazing exchange of ideas and some viewpoints I hadn’t considered. I’m always happy when we can talk about sewing outside of the craft and in a civilized, balanced manner.

A Not Well Thought Out Post On Affiliate Links

Last month I read an article about the rise of Reward Style in Texas Monthly. For the uninitiated, it’s a fashion affiliate link program started by a fashion blogger and her MBA husband (then boyfriend). They figured out a way for fashion blogging to be profitable.

These partygoers reached more than 13.5 million followers on Instagram combined. Many made more than $20,000 a month—some more than $80,000—just from posting links to sites that sold the short-shorts and Chanel shoes that they wore in their photos.

Now, for years I’ve thought sewing bloggers have undersold themselves. I’m all for community and being a part of it. My best friends come out of sewing and this blog. But, I tend to think twice before I directly directly link to products I liked, suggestions on things to buy or where to shop. I stopped for a couple of reasons.

  1. I didn’t really like being responsible for someone’s experience with a product.  Not that I am responsible, but I had a few people email me after buying something I recommended that they weren’t a fan of.
  2. I hated that a few times after I posted a product or referred people to something, the price/ demand would go up astronomically  (ex. Dritz vintage buttonhole maker, vintage Japanese pattern drafting books, newish Bunka garment design books and Traum tracing wheels).
  3. Why free advertise? It’s the same reason I don’t fill out user surveys. I think companies should pay for market research. I’ve been paid for market research outside of sewing too.

This is just something I arrived at on my own years ago. And, it’s solely my personal opinion. I haven’t put a ton of my own energy into thinking this through because it’s not about to cure cancer. It’s just something that was niggling at the back of my head.

I have a dear friend who works for a large cosmetics company. They pay bloggers when they wear their makeup. Not in kind gifts. But, literally pay them cash for references in addition to products. I remember at the time thinking it was crazy and people should blog for the love of it. But, the truth is, they are blogging for the love of it and the perks came after.

But, now that I’ve read about Reward Style and Like to Know It (Reward Style for Instagram) and I wonder why we don’t have the same for sewing. Aren’t we underselling our market value? Yes, there’s Fabric.com and Amazon.com affiliate links. But, what about Dritz, Fiskars, Palmer and Pletsch, Fons and Porter, sewing machine reviews, sewing pattern companies, fabric stores Etsy and eBay? I don’t even link to BurdaStyle downloads now.  I’ve bought SO MUCH *stuff* based on blog referrals! And, I’ve learned a lot too from other bloggers.

Believe me, I’m not saying people should make a living off blogging (once people go ‘pro’ I tend to find them a little boring). But, what’s so bad about getting something in return for the advertising one is giving anyway?

Feel free to discuss below. Or, roll your eyes and move on to another blog post.  Like I said, I’m not super passionate about this. But, am curious as to what other people think too.

**Full Disclosure: I had one blog sponsor about six years ago and was part of the inaugural group of the Mood Sewing Network.

Men’s Silk Neckties: Vogue 7104

Here’s something I forgot: Making neckties is horseshit.

 photo DSC_0014_zps90017dfc.jpg

If you can imagine, I  sewed three neckties as part of Jordan’s Hanukkah gifts this year. I suspect each holiday, he’s now going to get some boxers and some neckties. He’s been wearing these ties for almost two weeks now, but only let me snap a photo last night when he got home. I think his stint as a male model is coming to a close.

 photo DSC_0044_zps9af1edd0.jpg

I’ve gathered that most men don’t wear ties often anymore. Somehow, 85 percent of the guys I’ve dated wear ties daily.  As a lawyer Jordan wears them every day.  Even on casual Friday  he wears a tie (he’s just like that). He has a bunch from his father (retired attorney) and a few I took from my dad (church going black man).  He has more ties than I have shoes.  Despite rolling in ties, he asked if I could / knew how to make them. And, oh, do I. Long time readers will remember my irrational anger at sewing ties and breaking up with the gift recipient less than a month later. I figured it was time to break the Boyfriend Sweater/ Boyfriend Neckwear curse.

 photo DSC_0020_zpsc18223ff.jpg

Instead of the seven-fold ties I did last time, I used Vogue’s three-fold tie pattern with interlining. For interlining, I used drapery interlining from Haberman’s at $7 per yard (and 54 inches wide).   Their website said it was a good approximation for tie interfacing (like $25 a yard and 23 inches wide) and it was way way cheaper. Tie interfacing is usually made from wool. This is cotton but has that same light weft look to it. Tie interlining looks to be two layers of the weft.

 photo IMGP1558_zps7af27472.jpg

Ultimately, Jordan thought it felt not as hefty as the wool interlining in his RTW ties. I have since bought a few yards of wool tie interfacing from The Sewing Place to use on my next go round.  I also changed the interlining/ interfacing pattern. Vogue 7104 doesn’t have the interlining going all the way to the tip of the tie. All the ties I looked at do. So, I just traced the interlining pattern to mimic the finished tie.

 photo IMGP1563_zpsc726e18a.jpg

Ties are pretty simple in concept. It’s all bias cut, 1/4 inch seam allowances and nice fabric. Yet, the tie point is a real PITA. I don’t think my tie points (the tip) ever look as good as RTW. I sewed two muslins before I decided these were good enough. The next time I make these, I will follow my own advice for sewing the tips of the tie.  The lining and main fabric should be offset to create a good mitre. The Vogue instructions so not account / note that. Another good visual resource for sewing the tie tip is Sam Hober’s site.

 photo IMGP1553_zps924088f0.jpg

I did add a 1/4 inch in width to the pattern as drafted. And, I think I’m going to add another 1/4 for 1/2 inch more total for a 4 inch wide tie vs 3.25. Jordan’s favorite tie from his father is 3.75 inches wide.

 photo DSC_0008_zps1e3297ff.jpg

I think, like boxers, I should make these a couple times a year so I don’t forget how they go together. It really is a fast project with most of it hand sewing to close it up. That, I could easily do while watching a movie or TV.

 photo DSC_0016_zps22faa26b.jpg

Last bit about fabric. I think I’m a total purist when it comes to neckties. I like them made out of a thick silk twill. That fabric can can be really pricey. I’ve been lucky to get bits and pieces here and there. I try to snatch them up whenever I can. Belraff Fabrics has a lot well-priced necktie fabric right now. But, fair warning, most of the prints are of the lighter silk variety (the cream and green print at the top is from them). I’d stick with the preppy striped ones, they are a heavier silk and luscious.

So, why do I say they are horseshit? Just loads of fiddly bits. You just have to be precise, work with small seam allowances, cut silk fabric on the bias, loads of handsewing and work with with fabric that frays easily.  Of course, he loves his ties. LOVES them.

If you’re interested in making ties, I would also recommend checking out David Paige Coffin’s download on making ties at home.

Jordan made out like a handsewn bandit this year, didn’t he? He gotten a jacket,  boxers, a sweater, workout gear, cummerbund,  suit alterations and ties. If this keeps up, I’m going to have to rename my blog “Mister’s Emporium”.

The Most Hideous Garment I’ve Ever Blogged: Burda 9-2008 #110 and #111 Hybrid

 photo 000001715498_zpsf0e386ff.jpgI was weirdly intrigued by the grey #110 shirt when it first appeared in Burda back in 2008. Trena made it up and I still liked it. I wanted some quick tops to wear to work with my jeans (I seriously now wear jeans every single day). I realize that the top had high potential for looking ridiculous. So, I decided to muslin it in a long-stashed tee shirting before cutting in to my prized ponte. I took the hood and sleeves of the blue #111 from the same issue, kept the shorter length from the crazy collared #110.

 photo 000001715625_zps59d24d93.jpg

I figured it was ‘in between’ this way and I could still get a sense of how it would look before I committed to the Shakespearean collar. Now that I don’t even know what to do with my bust, I’ve been reading up on tops for an hourglass figure. Consensus is, lower / wide neck, wrap tops, waist definition, fitted is best. They should end below the hip / or just past the thighs.

This top does none of those things. NOT A ONE.

 photo DSC_0025_zps584b85f2.jpg

At worst, I look like a blueberry. At best, I look pregnant. Ultimately, this is a big fat lesson learned. I’ve been super drawn to full tops with no darts that end just below the waist. Look at what Kristy did with Burda’s 11/2013 #105. I friggin love that top! Trena warned me not to make the tops like that because it would look like boob tents. Just fabric hanging off my rack. She was right. Also, that length below, THE WORST EVER.

 photo DSC_0029_zps9ad2bce1.jpg

PSA: Don’t cut and sew after midnight. Listen, because I traced and cut this out after midnight. I put in darts for some unknown bizarro reason. This FBA should have been to just increase the gathers at the neck for width and probably not worry about the length since it’s so blousy. Darts are for fitting. There is no close fitting needed here. Besides, where I ended up putting the darts are really just pointing to my belly button. Don’t cut and sew after midnight.

 photo DSC_0069_zpsb1031d27.jpg

I did wear this to work today. And a lot of people liked it. I think it’s the color they were responding to. The length is actually not bad on me, when it doesn’t ride up. But, for real. This is the most hideous thing I’ve ever blogged. The most hideous thing I’ve ever made is a coat from ten years ago pre blog. HORRID. Even my mom told me to throw it away.

 photo DSC_0033_zps90879c64.jpg

Lord have mercy. I have to make tops with a waist!!

 photo DSC_0027_zpsa3cdc622.jpg

 

 

Orphan Sewing Machines

Last week, I was gifted three vintage sewing machines. The person who gave them to me was moving a relative into an assisted living facility. And, in cleaning her place, found three sewing machines. Now, I never say ‘no’ when offered a machine. It could be a machine I want to collect or has value. But, more importantly, I feel like there are always people who want to start sewing. And, I think the best way to start is on a free machine that works.

 photo DSC_0097_zps123f3fe9.jpg

The first is a Sears Kenmore 1703 in a table. I think the machine must have been top of the line when it came out.

 photo DSC_0098_zps0aee8864.jpg

It has cams for 25 different stitch patterns plus a built in zig zag. I thought about keeping this one. But, I really don’t have the space. And, I have three sewing machines as it is now :-)

 photo DSC_0099_zps7fac3522.jpg

The second machine is a Singer Merrit from the late 80s. It’s actually pretty solid and sews fairly well. It can also take cams to do some decorative stitches including a three-step-zigzag.

 photo DSC_0088_zps6fcbe610.jpg

The third machine is this green Singer 185k. It’s all metal and straight stitch machine. This is the only one of the lot I’m keeping. And, that’s just to set up and run my Singer buttonholer. Because it’s not in a table, I can make room for it.

 photo DSC_0010_zpsf8db72f9.jpg

I love my Bernina  830, but I am not down with a four step buttonhole.  All the machines were filthy and full of dust.

 photo DSC_0001_zpsdb6fb785.jpg

I didn’t pull out this last bit of red, because I think it’s felt that’s supposed to be in that spring.

 photo DSC_0005_zps55e25c14.jpg

I also really like that it was made in Great Britain.

 photo DSC_0015_zps623783e7.jpg

The Singer Merrit and Kenmore are both listed on Freecycle and I suspect they’ll be gone in a few days.

Wigan: The Reveal

It’s been over a month since you guys helped me track down ‘real’ wigan. And, I owe you a little round up. I didn’t get to it sooner because I am lazy.  But, the good thing is when cleaning out some part of the house, I was able to find a sample of the original ‘good’ wigan I had from G Street Fabrics. So, I can do an actual comparison of all of them and not from mythical memory. That said, here we go.

From left to right, here are the various wigans I have.

 photo IMGP1735_zps12625cc0.jpg

Wigan from Sew True in 2011, G Street wigan circa 2007, Lichtenstein & Co. in Brooklyn, B. Black & Sons and Claire Schaeffer. Now, I did get wigan from Banasch’s in Cincinnati also. It’s extremely similar to Lichtenstein’s sample. And, I can’t find it. I swear to you these were all kept together. But, it has disappeared. One more reason it took me so long to blog the results.

And, added bonus, a little video where I talk about the differences in the wigan. I apologize now for the autofocus. And, the rapid hand movement. I was a TV reporter. Not a presenter on QVC. ** doh. I see my home address is posted in the video and so I’ve deleted the video.

  • Overall the Sew True wigan is utter BS. Here’s the email I sent to them when I ordered it three years ago.

I received my order earlier this week. Thank you for the quick response. I’m a little confused on one item. I ordered sleeve wigan, sew in. The item I received is a bias cut fusible on a roll. Wigan I bought several years ago was rather stiff and scratchy. This is pretty soft and pliable. Is it possible I received bias fusible interfacing rather than the wigan?

No response ever received.

  • I called G Street and the woman who answered said they didn’t carry it and she was responsible for all the tailoring supplies and interfacing. So, it’s unicorn tears. It’s got a strong hand and is perfect for a heavy wool coat hem.
  • Lichtenstin ((212) 226-5921)  / Banasch’s is almost as stiff as the G Street. I would definitely buy from them. They sell it in varying widths too.
  • B. Black and Sons is all kinds of wrong. It’s floppy and not cut on the bias. I can only assume that it is batiste that is wrongly labeled. From the photos, this looks more right.
  • Claire Schaeffers’ is a little softer than Lichtenstein’s / Banasch’s. But, I think that’s fine. It’s a different weight for a sligthly light tailoring application — say a tailored jacket.

So, there you have it. ‘real’ wigan is available from Lichtenstein, Banasch’s and Claire Schaeffer. B. Black might have the good stuff, but I didn’t get it with my sample. If I ever make it to Los Angels, I’ll try and go in person and feel it out. I did also call several other NY Garment District stores and they said they didn’t send samples, or couldn’t ‘open’ a roll (which made me think it wasn’t real wigan anyway).

Thank you all for your help! Now, I just need to get started on an actual coat project, hunh?