Posted in sewing

Burdastyle Letterman’s Jacket: 9/2014 #134

Last project of 2017 methinks! Fitting that it’s my favorite person’s Hanukkah gift!

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Jordan showed me the tweed Shinola Varsity jacket below a month ago and said how much he liked it. It was $500 — which I actually don’t think is too much to pay for US made product (I mean, it’s what I would charge AT LEAST). But, about $400 more than I would pay if I made it for him.

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He picked out his own fabric from Fabricmart and I settled on the September 2013 #134 Burdastyle varsity jacket.

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At first I was like, that’s not a varsity jacket! Where are the leather sleeves? It has a zipper not snaps! But, once I sewed the muslin I saw why they said varsity vs aviator or bomber. The sleeves are dropped like a varsity jacket and it’s much longer in the torso (and my boy has a short torso).

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I decided to make a muslin because I’ve only made him one semi-fitted outerwear garments (this Hot Patterns jacket from three years ago) and am I glad I did. I HATE HATE HATED the shoulders on this. Those folds at the armscyce made me want to scream.

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Blech. Look how long the shoulders are! Looking at the original photo on the model I can see that they are long/ wide. But, this looked sloppy to me. And, I wanted a more fitted aviator style (in truth, maybe I should have gone with this Burdastyle from 12/2015 #125).

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The first thing I did was narrow the shoulder sleeve by 1″ making it more an extended shoulder rather than dropped. The nice thing about using this thick old blanket for the muslin is I could really get a sense of how the fabric would work in wool.

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Than, taking advice from Instagram, I saw Jordan has sloped shoulders. I really think he has overdeveloped traps with short shoulders rather than technically sloped. But, semantics.

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Jordan’s chest is 44″ which puts him in a Burdastyle men’s 56. His shoulders are 6.25″ long and his waist was between the 50/52 size (I went with 52). I also shortened the jacket by two inches in the second muslin (I just made edits to the first muslin).

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Here’s the back now with the shortened shoulder and a 1/2″ adjustment for sloped shoulders. I figured out his shoulder drop by using my level and comparing his drop to that of the pattern. I felt rather clever for having thought of that and it worked! Those horrible folds are mostly gone and the shoulder seam is sitting now where it should. Thanks smarter people than me on Instagram!

Lining

The jacket is lined in flannel back satin. And, I used stay tape at the shoulders. The original jacket has quilted satin for the lining. I kind of wish I had done this to increase the temperature range for wearing the jacket. But, then again, I’m okay with the flannel back satin and tweed combo.

The ribbing is from Neotrims Etsy shop based in the UK. I LOVED the selection there. This ribbing is mostly wool with lots of bounce. But, you could certainly find some at Pacific Trim or any one of the NY trim stores (I though briefly about making the ribbing but was running out of time to have this ready for Hanukkah). I did end up taking two inches out of the collar pattern so it would snug up against his neck. And, I see that the collar isn’t 100%. But, it’s good enough. Oh, I also had to shorten the sleeves by 3″.

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The welt pockets were sewn using a technique from Kennth King’s Cool Coture. It took me an embarrassing amount of time to wrap my mind around the technique and THREE samples before I got the hang of it. But, once I did I saw how elegant a technique it was. He has a class on pockets that covers this technique on Craftsy if you’re interested.

The pocket bags themselves are a little small I think. Just big enough for a phone really. But, not quite large enough for jamming your hands into for warmth.

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Isn’t he the cutest? Like for real. THE CUTEST.

He told me these are the best looking sleeves he’s had in a garment (they are always too long or too short). Plus, he usually has things taken in a bit at the waist. I don’t know that I would ever try and sew for him as a surprise either. It was much less stressful to try it on as I went — just like I would for myself. That’s all! He’s happy with his jacket. I felt like a magician! He saw something he wanted and I was actually able to make it!

Posted in sewing

Burda 12-2010 #134: Men’s Running Shorts

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Jordan was part of his office’s relay team for the Baltimore Marathon last week. I had to work so I missed his leg which went RIGHT by our house.  Knowing I wouldn’t see him run, I decided to make him a new pair of running shorts so it would be a little like I was with him (and I HATE his running shorts. From high school. Baggy and disgusting.). He not so politely declined a matching shirt. Spoilsport.

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I didn’t have any specific running shorts patterns. But, realized I could take a pair of pajama pants, shorten them and call it a day. I chose the Burdstyle pajama pants from 12-2010 #134 after seeing them made up as boxers on the Burdastyle website.

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Burdastyle 12-2010-134 shortened to boxers

 

I have made him a few pairs of pj bottoms from Simplicity 1520 (above) and he wears them all the time. They have a ton of ease which is great for sleeping but I’ve been dying to get him into something a little more…. European.

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I modeled these shorts after  Brooks Running shorts. The both have a faux fly and an internal drawstring.

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The blue fabric is from my stash purchased at PR Weekend in Montreal back in 2008. I used most of it before to make Jalie running skirts in 2010.  It has minimal stretch, like maybe 15% and still needed a ball point needle or it skipped stitches. It’s athletic shiny on one side and brushed cotton on the inside (he’s wearing these with some of the Jalie 2327 athletic wicking boxers I’ve made him in the past).

For seam allowance I added 3/8″ seam. And used two strands of thread through one needle for the faux top stitching at the fly.

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I added pockets to these stabilizing them with 1/4″ twill tape and understitching so they laid flat. I considered a zipper at the pockets. But, realized the deep pockets with a small opening would be safe enough for his phone while running.

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The pattern calls for a separately added waistband and a drawstring. Too fussy for me! I added three inches to the top of the pants pattern, turning that down to the inside to create my casing. I used Stretchrite elastic from Amazon with an integrated drawcord cut three inches smaller than his 37″ waist measurement.

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I sewed this up on my sewing machine and didn’t finish the seams on my serger. Hemmed with my coverstitch which I really need to spend some time getting to know better.

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I guessed a bit on the length. Jordan was traveling for Yom Kippur when I made them. But, I now have a lovely male body form that my dad bought me for my birthday that I can use to guesstimate these things! Except, it’s definitely bigger in the legs than Jordan so I was worried it wouldn’t fit. Oh, the form is from The Shop Company. I’ll write a review of it and the ordering process (which was a bit of nightmare) after I’ve used it some more.

But, as you see it fits him fine. I wanted them about two inches shorter. But, we compromised on length.  This pair is a good model for the swim trunks I’ve been wanting to make him. I might add more seam allowance though just to accommodate for the loss of stretch in the swimwear fabric I bought.

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70s Style Knit Shirtdress: Burdastyle 4/2011 #108

I recently told Jordan with great pride that I hadn’t purchased any fabric in 2017. His reply, “That’s only five months.” Bubble burst.  I haven’t bought for a few reasons. The main one being I have more fabric than I can sew in my current lifetime. And, I was losing track of the fabrics I loved and the projects I’ve always wanted to make. In addition, we are going to sell and buy a new home in the next two years and before we do so I’d like to get my stash down to…. visible.

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Anywho, one such project that’s floated in the back of my mind for years is a graphic jersey shirtdress. Two years ago I saw wonderful 70s style knit shirt dresses at the Halston exhibit at FIT and promised myself I’d make a knit shirtdress ‘soon’. This pattern from the April 2011 Burdastyle (and still available for download) is JUST the look I was going for.

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My  poly jersey fabric came from Jomar in Philadelphia some time ago. I originally thought a 70s style wrap dress. But, I knew it would be GREAT as a shirt dress. I contemplated snaps  rather than buttons to keep the print uninterrupted. But, found these buttons in my stash. To make the buttonholes, I used a light tricot jersey in the facing and front band. Then, I also used tear away stabilizer. I’ve seen knit buttons wonky in RTW and wanted to make mine as neat as possible.

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I legit think I haven’t sewn a stand collar in years. I’d rate this one a 7/10 and am glad I won’t ever button this at the neck. I used instructions from the Better Homes and Garden Sewing Book and my Bunka Garment Design Textbook: Blouses and Dresses. Because Burda sure wasn’t giving me detailed instruction on sewing a stand collar! Next time I’ll be using my David Paige Coffin Shirtmaking book.

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I’ve avoided using this print for a while because I don’t trust my print matching skills. For this dress, I focused on a straight horizontal line at the front and back and decided to let the rest do what it do.

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The pattern itself is drafted for a woven. So, I sized down one to a 42 at the top and 44 through the thighs. If I make this up in a woven, I’ll just add to the seam allowances. I think the fit is spot on and will make for a great fitted shirt too. I have a second version I’m working on in a silk jersey that has less stretch and is gonna be a snug one!

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I made a 1 inch FBA. I usually make a larger FBA in BWOF. But, I’ve been sewing a 40 up top for a while. This time, I finally used my upper bust measurement rather than my underbust and I’m really happy with the fit (if not the increase in size!).

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Overall I lurv it. And, it reinforces my goal to sew somewhat from a plan this summer and focus on what I have. As for that plan… it involves more red,white and blue and shirtdresses 😀

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Posted in sewing

Button Front Skirt: Burdastyle 9-2009 #125

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About 20+ years ago I had a thrifted a-line skirt made from denim with buttons up the front. I’m not sure whatever happened to that skirt. But, I have noticed these skirts are all the rage lately and it seemed like a perfect summer skirt.  Enter BurdaStyle 9-2009 #125

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A really lovely basic skirt. It’s made up a few ways in the magazine including leather with the front closures or with a side zip in three different lengths.

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For my first version (because of course I made two) I used some leftover orange and cream stretch twill from the creamscicle dress I made six years ago.

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I sewed a 40 at the waist grading out to a 46 at the lower thigh. I also made swayback adjustment but totally forgot to add the inch I took out from the waist back to the skirt hem. So, it rides up a little in the back :-/ Also, my fabric is stretch so it flares a bit more than the pattern draft calls for.

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When sewing a skirt without a waistband, it’s inherently going to stretch as it’s all bias. So, you’ll want to use twill tape in the waist seam allowances or be sure to double stitch the waistline. Since I was making mine from denim and not leather, I also interfaced the front fold extension.

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The insides are all serged. It would be very pretty if I’d bound the insides (or useful if I’d taken a photo of the insides…)  But, I didn’t. I paired this skirt with my summer sweater made from orange cotton. It’s slouchy and comfy with this more casual skirt.

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Blue Denim:

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I wanted a skirt reminiscent of a traditional denim skirt and mimicked my high school skirt.  And, I wanted it to be casual enough to wear with some of the graphic tees I have but never wear (because I don’t have anything to wear them with).  My only additional alteration with this version was to add an extra inch in length to the skirt overall, but of course not to the center back to make up for my swayback adjustment. Sigh.

Jordan thinks these skirts are shorter than I normally wear. He claims I like to cover my knees. But, I wanted something short for summer that subbed in for actual shorts 🙂

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For this version, I used really cute donut jeans buttons. I used dark grey topstitching thread and it pulls the nickel of the buttons in nicely. All but two of these buttons popped off while wearing or putting on the first few times.

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Overall, a nice little summer skirt pattern. And, for once I am on trend!  Plus, you know I love anything even vaguely nautical 🙂

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This is an embarrassingly bad salute. I am clearly out of practice.

 

 

Posted in sewing

Feeling Myself: Leopard Print Wrap Dress

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When I found this leopard print poly knit on a shopping trip with friends in August 2015, I knew it HAD to become a DVF style wrap dress using my previously made Burdastyle from October 2011.

That time we bought all the fabric #latergram @rollingincloth @cubanitacose @karen.heenan

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It’s funny I was drawn to this, because I tend to avoid animal prints (I read a study in college about how black models were more likely to be photographed in animal prints and said ‘F that noise’). That said, I also LOVE this leopard print dress I made in 2012.

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Give me *all* the 70s

 

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I had this Burdastyle pattern cut out by the end of September 2015. But, life happens, I became obsessed with machine knitting and I lost my sewing mojo when a very expensive fabric order from Mood was stolen off my front porch (Yeah. Seriously.) We’ve had a string of package thefts and this one made off with $200 in dove gray wool coating from Mood. And, I’m sure he just threw it away.

Video Evidence:

Luckily, because it was purchased on my Visa, they sent me a check for the fabric (which I didn’t bother replacing). And, now everything gets delivered to my office :-/

After some time, I finally picked this dress back up to get it off my sewing table in March. And, I love it. I feel like a total fox.

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You can tell I am just FEELING myself.

Rather than sew facings this time (which I despised) I used a narrow knit binding treatment. The binding is cut 1 inch wide on the bias. It is then sewn on doubled, along the 1/4 inch seam allowance, and folded again creating a strong binding that is the width of the seam allowance.   **technique well explained and photographed in Singer’s ‘Sewing Activewear’.

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The fabric was a little thin so I underlined throughout (except for the sleeves) with black tricot. I underlined rather than lined as I wanted it to be treated as one piece. And, it was a terrible, terrible mistake. I tried to hem the dress. But, the underlining and fashion fabric hung differently making it a lumpy saggy mess. So, I had to hack off several inches, trim the bottom evenly and go with no hem. Overall it’s shorter than I would like, but again: FEEL. ING. MY. SELF.

After my last project’s failure, I ended up wearing this out for my birthday dinner in Santa Fe with Jordan. Rawwrr.